Atri

Apr 172017
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Rebecca Brewster
(770) 432-0628
April 17, 2017

Arlington, VA – The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI), the trucking industry’s not-for-profit research organization, today released the results of its analysis of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners (NRCME), conducted in collaboration with Mayo Clinic.

ATRI and Mayo Clinic jointly surveyed over 900 commercial drivers, 300 motor carriers and 1,200 certified medical examiners (CMEs) to better understand the impacts that the NRCME has had on the trucking industry since its implementation in 2014.  The NRCME was designed to improve the DOT physical exam process and ensure that medical examiners understand FMCSA regulations and guidance for issuing medical certificates.

ATRI’s research focused on commercial driver and motor carrier impacts and identified the following:

  • A majority of drivers (63.3%) reported increased exam costs following implementation of the NRCME, yet were not experiencing commensurate improvements in exam quality; only 6.2 percent of drivers reported improved exam quality post-NRCME implementation.
  • 6 percent of drivers reported spending 20 minutes or less with their CME, with 6.5 percent of those drivers spending 10 minutes or less, an insufficient time to complete all required processes of a DOT physical.  Drivers certified by chiropractors were more likely to have important medical checks omitted.
  • Among the 5.9 percent of drivers who were not issued a medical certificate on the day of their physical exam, 22.6 percent cited having a medical condition that required treatment before certificate issuance as the reason.
  • Motor carriers still have significant concerns related to the medical certification process, including requests by CMEs for additional medical documentation causing certification delays, driver confusion of how regulatory changes impact the ability to hold a valid medical certificate, and concerns with the competency of CMEs.  Nearly 50 percent of motor carriers reported that they specify which CME their drivers see to ensure medical exam quality.
  • Less than one percent of carriers reported no major concerns with the medical certification process.
  • The ability of drivers to find a CME close to where they live may be more challenging in the future as 15.3 percent of CMEs reported that they have quit performing DOT physicals or plan to quit performing DOT physicals.

“The data show a polarity in quality of medical examiners,” said Clayton T. Cowl, MD, MS, Chair of Mayo Clinic’s Division of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine.  “Those examiners who are performing only minimal examinations may have received substandard training or are not taking their role seriously. The key seems to strike a balance between meeting the regulatory intent of the examinations and communicating with drivers ahead of time to minimize confusion regarding the need to document clinical stability. This is particularly true for drivers with multiple or complex medical conditions from whom medical examiners do need more documentation in order to make a certification decision.”

“The inconsistency in quality of exams provided our drivers creates real challenges for us as a fleet.  Where in one terminal location a driver may be required to undergo extensive tests and provide additional documentation prior to getting a medical certificate, drivers in other locations are expedited through with cursory exams,” said Victor Hart, Director of Safety for DOT Transportation.

You can download a copy of this report, as well as a white paper detailing the findings of Mayo Clinic’s survey of medical examiners, on ATRI’s website by clicking here.

Click here to listen to ATRI’s Rebecca Brewster and Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Clay Cowl discuss the research findings.


ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization.  It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system. To learn more about ATRI, visit www.atri-online.org.

Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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Apr 172017
 

Click here to listen to ATRI’s Rebecca Brewster and Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Clay Cowl discuss the research findings.

For a free copy of the report and summary of findings electronically, please provide your information in the form.  Once you click submit, links will appear below where you may download this research:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr 122017
 

For a free copy of this report electronically, please provide the information below. Once your information has been submitted a link will appear on this page for you to download the report:

Mar 292017
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Carla Rose
(770) 432-0628
March 29, 2017

Arlington, VA – The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) today launched an online data collection to solicit commercial driver perspectives on a number of top industry issues.  The driver feedback will be utilized in several ATRI studies focused on transportation infrastructure funding, the driver shortage, and improving highway safety.

ATRI initially collected driver input on these topics through a survey at last week’s Mid-America Trucking Show (MATS) where ATRI staff collected over 500 driver surveys.  The online version of the same survey conducted at MATS will allow larger numbers of professional drivers to weigh in on these important topics.

“Driver involvement is so critical to ATRI’s research and we were extremely pleased with the number of surveys completed at MATS,” said Rebecca Brewster, ATRI President and COO.  “We encourage drivers to spend a few minutes completing the online survey so that driver opinions are included in the research on these timely issues.”

The survey is available online HERE.


ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system. 

Feb 272017
 

For a free copy of this report electronically, please provide the information below. Once your information has been submitted you will be directed to a page with a link to download the report:

Feb 272017
 

For a free copy of this report electronically, please provide the information below. Once your information has been submitted you will be directed to a page with a link to download the report:

Feb 272017
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Dan Murray
(612) 210-6950
February 27, 2017

Arlington, VA – The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) today posted two new truck parking studies on its website.

The lack of available truck parking continues to be a hot research topic for ATRI and these latest studies, completed for the Minnesota Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration, examine new approaches for identifying available truck parking capacity.

In the first, “Utilizing Truck GPS Data to Assess Parking Supply and Demand,” ATRI presents a technical analysis that utilizes truck GPS data to assess truck parking capacity at four Minnesota rest areas. This first-of-its-kind research assessed truck parking supply and demand by time-of-day and day-of-week by cross-referencing truck GPS data to identify truck activity at several state-run rest stops.

The second, “A Comprehensive System for Assessing Truck Parking Availability” details a field test conducted by ATRI and the University of Minnesota to deliver real-time truck parking information to commercial drivers through three separate delivery systems: 1) Roadside Changeable Message Signs (CMS); 2) an Internet/Website information portal; and 3) through in-cab communication systems.

Both studies successfully demonstrated new approaches for identifying where additional truck capacity is needed and how delivering real-time information on parking availability to commercial drivers can improve their operational efficiency. The reports are available at the respective links above or by going to ATRI’s Truck Parking page by clicking here.


ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system. 

Feb 052017
 

For a free copy of this report electronically, please provide the information below. Once your information has been submitted you will be directed to a page with a link to download the report:

Feb 012017
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Mike Tunnell
(916) 300-3161
February 1, 2017

Arlington, VA – The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) continues to update and maintain a listing of state and local idling regulations on its website by clicking here.  The listing is provided in two forms, an online compendium which provides detailed information and Internet links to each of the 60 state and local regulations which have been identified; and a cab card which provides a consolidated listing of the state and local limits.  The cab card is designed to be downloaded and carried in the glove box of a truck.

The latest update includes two newly enacted regulations.

  1. San Antonio joins the growing number of Texas cities and counties that have implemented a 5 minute idling limit. Exemptions include Hours-of-Service compliance beyond two miles of facilities with available external heat or air connections and trucks with Certified Clean Idle engines.  The new limit went into effect on January 1, 2017 with fines up to $500.
  2. Ann Arbor, Michigan will implement a new 5 minute limit beginning on July 1, 2017. Exemptions will be provided for rest or sleep breaks beyond 25 miles of available truck stop electrification or shore power or when temperatures are less than 32° F or greater than 85° F and a temperature-controlled area is not accessible.  Violations may result in a minimum fine of $500.

ATRI continues to monitor the development of idling regulations across the country and provides the compendium and cab card as a free service to help trucking companies and truck drivers comply with the myriad of state and local idling regulations.


ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system. 

Feb 012017
 

ATRI publishes a compendium of current idling regulations by state, which is provided for free in two different PDF formats — the original compendium listing and as a foldable cab card for quick reference. ATRI updates the compendium regularly.

The information contained in these compendiums is for reference purposes only and should not be relied upon for regulatory compliance. This information may contain errors and omissions and is subject to change. Actual state, county, or city codes should be referenced for specific requirements. Online users may access these codes by clicking on the individual regulations listed.